Here is my Narrative Clip. Just got it, about to find out what it can do.

  1. Camera: iPhone 5s
  2. Aperture: f/2.2
  3. Exposure: 1/120th
  4. Focal Length: 4mm

Dr. BIll Thomas’s Second Wind Tour is criss-crossing the country providing host communities with a day-long exploration of what it means to catch a “second wind” in one’s life and work. (Dr. Thomas is the founder of the Eden Alternative and the Green House Project, which have reimimagined nursing homes as more humane environments.)

I attended the Second Wind event at the Palace of Fine Arts in SF on Wednesday, April 16, as a guest of California HealthCare Foundation, one of the local sponsors.

  1. Camera: Panasonic DMC-GX1
  2. Aperture: f/2.8
  3. Exposure: 1/60th
  4. Focal Length: 26mm

Saying they can no longer ignore the rising prices of health care, some of the most influential medical groups in the nation are recommending that doctors weigh the costs, not just the effectiveness of treatments, as they make decisions about patient care.

The shift, little noticed outside the medical establishment but already controversial inside it, suggests that doctors are starting to redefine their roles, from being concerned exclusively about individual patients to exerting influence on how health care dollars are spent.

In practical terms, new guidelines being developed by the medical groups could result in doctors choosing one drug over another for cost reasons or even deciding that a particular treatment — at the end of life, for example — is too expensive. In the extreme, some critics have said that making treatment decisions based on cost is a form of rationing.

British retirees may soon receive a novel kind of financial advice, courtesy of the state: They could be told when they are likely to die.

“People are living a lot longer, so we have to make sure they have up-to-date information,” the pensions minister, Steve Webb, said Thursday in an interview with the BBC.

Gender, age and “perhaps asking one or two basic questions, like whether you’ve smoked or not,” Mr. Webb said, should be enough to determine how long, on average, someone is likely to live. Having an idea of life expectancy would help retirees with private pensions manage their finances more efficiently, he said.

"To unlink payment from the volume of services provided and begin aligning it with value, Oregon recently launched the Alternative Payment Methodology (APM) demonstration project, where participating community health centers (CHCs)—aka federally qualified health centers—no longer earn revenue based on the number of individual patient seen. Instead, community health centers will receive a monthly payment based on the size and composition of their patient population, shifting the paradigm from the number of doctor visits to the provision of high-quality, team-based, patient-centered care. APM is being piloted at three Oregon Community Health Centers: Virginia Garcia Memorial Health Center, Mosaic Medical, and OHSU Family Medicine at Richmond. The clinics are receiving technical assistance from the Oregon Primary Care Association (OPCA) and other community, regional and national partners."

In October 2011, filmmaker Jeroen Wolf started documenting people from age zero to 100 in the city of Amsterdam, approaching them in the street and asking them to say their age in front of the camera.

This wonderful video is the result of his people “collecting” project.

                    What Makes a Community Age-Friendly?

Grantmakers In Aging (GIA)

Age-friendly communities and CommunityAGEnda

(Source: youtube.com)

"An incredible visualization of the development story of 200 countries, shown over 200 years and beyond, in just 4 minutes"

John Gardner’s life was a marvelous example of renewal. In 1964, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, that ultimate lifetime achievement award, for his work in education and philanthropy. Already in his 50s with a long track record of achievement, he nevertheless refused to accept a ‘gold watch’ or an end to purpose—in fact, he was just getting started.

Over the next decades, Gardner served as Lyndon Johnson’s Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, where he implemented Medicare and many other groundbreaking reforms, then went on to found Common Cause and Independent Sector, and to help preside over the creation of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with authoring a series of books on leadership and civil society. It’s no wonder that The New York Times titled an article about him, “Father of Invention.”

Stanford University is looking for a new kind of student: proven leaders, with 20 to 30 years of work experience, seeking to reinvent their futures.

A small experiment launched this week offers older students the opportunity not to retire but retrain — and commit to new and meaningful projects.

The yearlong Distinguished Careers Institute is not for everyone. It will pluck 20 high achievers and place them in one of the most elite educational environments in the world to swap experiences and insights with their generations younger classmates.

America’s seniors have historically been late adopters to the world of technology compared to their younger compatriots, but their movement into digital life continues to deepen, according to newly released data from the Pew Research Center.

Two different groups of older Americans emerge. The first group (which leans toward younger, more highly educated, or more affluent seniors) has relatively substantial technology assets, and also has a positive view toward the benefits of online platforms. The other (which tends to be older and less affluent, often with significant challenges with health or disability) is largely disconnected from the world of digital tools and services, both physically and psychologically.